Category: book fairs

13
Dec

Top 3 Ways of Boosting Your Author Career Through Writing Conferences

Top 3 ways of boosting author career with writing conferences

You’ve probably heard that conferences are essential to your writing career development, but do you know why?

The PublishDrive team attended several conferences this fall where we either gave a talk or simply had the chance to mingle with writers. As the number of author-related conferences grows rapidly year by year, you may be wondering which ones are best for you. In this article, I summarize various types of author-related conferences and my personal takeaways.

To sum up, I’ve attended the following conferences: Digital Book World (Nashville), Romance Con (Richmond), National Writers Union Conference (New York), Las Vegas Book Festival (Las Vegas), 20booksto50k (Las Vegas), YALLfest (Charleston), and Miami Book Fair (Miami) – I’ve definitely compiled a list of thoughts!

Here are my top three recommendations for leveraging the power of conferences in the publishing industry:

  • Attend the conference that fits your publishing journey.
  • Learn from other writers and attendees and collaborate with them.
  • Prepare for conferences accordingly and have fun! 🙂

Continue Reading…

Spread the word:
12
Oct

The story behind subscription pricing of PublishDrive

Bradley Matrock from Score Publishing and Digital Book World asks Kinga Jentetics, CEO of PublishDrive about PublishDrive’s new pricing model.

PublishDrive announced three new features at this year’s Digital Book World: a new ebook conversion tool, a categorization tool with AI, and a new pricing option that allows authors to keep all of their royalties.

Kinga Jentetics shares how the new pricing option works and the inspiration behind it.
Continue Reading…

Spread the word:
28
Aug

Writer’s Digest Annual Conference 2018 – Key Takeaways

Attending industry events (both writing and publishing conferences) is an important part of our job. Asking people to sign up for PublishDrive is secondary; we’re more interested in simply getting to know authors, listening to their experiences, understand what works for them and what doesn’t, what are their needs and desires.

But is going to conferences worth it for indie authors?

In the third part of our “industry events” series, we highlight our impressions and experiences of Writer’s Digest Conference 2018.

Previous articles:

Continue Reading…

Spread the word:
20
Jul

Key Takeaways of ThrillerFest 2018

If you attended ThrillerFest 2018 (July 2018 NYC), the annual conference of ITW, International Thriller Writers, then you know what a great experience this event is for book people who have a special interest in thriller fiction. The gathering was created in 2004 by successful, bestselling authors to bring thousands of writers, readers, publishers, producers, editors, and agents together to promote and support thriller authors everywhere.

If you did not have the chance to attend this friendly, educational, career-enhancing conference, put it on your list for next July in NYC. For now, I offer a few key takeaways from the various panels I attended that were peopled by high-profile authors and professional book marketers who gave their time over the 4-day event to help newbie and debut authors on their journey to publishing success!

Continue Reading…

Spread the word:
03
Nov

Frankfurt Book Fair As Indie Author – Should you go?

Are you interested in attending a book fair as indie author? Should you attend book fairs as an independent author at the first place, or is this just a waste of money? This question is driving most authors nuts: on one hand, book fairs seem like the heart of publishing industry, where experts from all fields meet, network, make deals and give amazingly interesting lectures. On the other hand, book fairs are all about signing deals and making new contracts: what can an indie author make out of it?

As a relative newbie in the publishing industry, this was the first year I ever attended book fairs: early summer I went to London (this was kind of home territory), then this October I participated in Frankfurt Book Fair: I thought it will be similar to the London one, but I was mistaken.

At this point, most big book fairs have an area dedicated to indie publishing. However, this area always is a tad detached from the rest of the fair: in London, Author HQ was right behind children’s books, at the far end of the fair; and in Frankfurt, author services were at the back of Hall 3.0, Amazon present with only a tiny stand in a whole separate building dedicated for German publishing. Definitely very far away from the rest of the fair that was happening mostly in Halls 4 and 6, with the agents’ lounge and the business tables all situated in at least 10 minutes of walk; and surrounded with German teens queuing up for signings.

Authorpreneur event at Frankfurt Book Fair 2017

Despite the hostile environment, though, the organizers of the International Independent Author Program (Porter Anderson and the Publishing Perspectives) did everything in their power to make the program interesting and engaging.

Starting with IngramSpark’s Andrew Bromley (who was the only one using the great chance to give away free books); continuing with ALLi’s Orna Ross giving an inspiring pep talk on how the indies should use every opportunity to give away free samples of their writing (by blogging for example) in order to attract much needed audience; and finishing with our very own CEO Kinga talking about smart tools indie publishers can use to increase their ebook sales, the program has something in it for authorpreneurs at all levels. Last but not least, there was a discussion involving all speakers and the audience.

I’m sure that all attendees have enjoyed it.

However, it isn’t necessary to have been present in Frankfurt in order to access all these talks and much more: ALLi organized an Indie Author Fringe to coincide with the Fair, collected great speakers on their own and published recordings of the Frankfurt speeches as well. All for free. Lecturers include Porter Anderson on whether Frankfurt Book Fair is indie author friendly, Joanna Penn and Sukhi Jutla on how to become an author-enterpreneur and Tim Lewis on using a podcast to deepen follower engagement.
Continue Reading…

Spread the word:
13
Oct

Other Disruptors: New Ways of Distribution, VR and Royalty Share

This is the third, final part of our series focused on industry disruptors. The first part analysed how AI will automatize much of the marketing, and the second was interested in whether blockchain is here to decentralize distribution and pose a threat to Amazon and Google.

In the third part of the series, we are focusing on disruptors once again: how they change distribution and book production processes.

There is only a certain number of regular readers, and it seems like traditional publishers and self-publishers are fighting againsteach other to see who is able to get the biggest slice of the pie instead of simply focusing on providing better solutions to the readers.

As Richard Nash points out: there are two contrasting tendencies working against each other, both extremely low prices set by Amazon and extremely high prices set by traditional publishers. And this is the point where industry disruptors can come into picture.

Can you enter the price competition without compromising on quality? Will you present yourself as a premium service? Today’s biggest question is how to keep your professional integrity and stay on your feet.

 

Continue Reading…

Spread the word:
12
Oct

Blockchain: A Technology Publishers Have Never Heard of is Here to Disrupt the Industry

(This article was written in anticipation of the ALLi organized session at Frankfurt Book Fair on this topic and will be updated with the developments. It has been inspired by ALLi and the articles written by Orna Ross.)

Cutting edge technology is usually here to solve problems we never knew we had at the first place. There is much less talk, however, about problems that have been around for a while and have finally become close to being solved.

Some of the problems creative industry as a whole is facing concern author payments, licensing and rights. With an amazing amount of ‘free’ content available (speaking of music on Youtube or Spotify, news and other types of journalistic content, books and images), it is hardly traceable how and when the creators will get paid. With an astonishingly long chain between writers and readers, creators and audience, it is only a fraction of the money that gets back to the original creators of the IP. Not to mention that in addition to taking a big slice of the cake, end-distributors use data and advertising revenue generated mainly by content they don’t own – this data and revenue is never redistributed.

On the other hand, licences are difficult to get hold of. If I would like to find a picture for illustration purposes, I can search certain databases for free-to-use images and then hope that the information is correct. While the creative commons standard improved this area a lot, there is still a lot of unauthorized use. (This could be due to mechanisms being mistaken and only partially automatized.)

Unauthorized use can range from posting a cool gif on tumblr without crediting the original creator (as there is literally no way to find it) to obvious theft. It is not only end-user piracy content creators are afraid of, but monetizing stolen IP. There is always the option of better DRM. But does it really solve the problem?

Continue Reading…

Spread the word:
11
Oct

How Can Writers And Publishers Utilise Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Putting aside the constant scare of whether robots will soon take our jobs – coming even from creatives -, AI is already here and more and more companies are using it. But what does AI stand for and how can writers and publishers utilise artificial intelligence? This article starts with a little history for newcomers, then explores some solutions that are already existent and available for all and poses some questions about the future.

This year’s Frankfurt Book Fair is all about innovation and technology. On this note, let’s explore what AI can do for publishers, and whether there is anything publishers can do for AI.

Artificial Intelligence: Definition and brief history

Audience analysis and engagement

Content analysis, recommendation and creation


Continue Reading…

Spread the word:
19
Apr

Book’n’Seek tool by PublishDrive to monitor your ebooks on sale

Introduced at the London Book Fair in 2017 PublishDrive’s brand new Book and Seek feature is a quality assurance management tool to help provide transparency and quality assurance in the publishing industry. It might sound obvious, but it is good to keep in mind that a book will only make you money, if it is out on sale. We found that working with more distribution partners at a time, keeping track of your books on sale in different stores can be chaotic and time-consuming.

On our Book’n’Seek platform you can simply use ISBN and later on your titles to search for you books and monitor the stores in which they are available for sale.

How does it work?

Continue Reading…

Spread the word:
30
Mar

Coverage of London Book Fair 2017

Book fairs play a vital role in publishing and allow publishers, authors, industry professionals from all around the world to meet and do business in a fun way. The London Book Fair is no exception to that. The 3-day event (14th-16th March, 2017) was held at Olympia with more than 25,000 visitors. There were two floors in two main halls filled with around 1,500 exhibitors from more than 60 countries. This year the market focus was on Poland with a big Polish pavilion highlighting the country’s dynamic publishing industry and to increase awareness of its literary traditions.
Continue Reading…

Spread the word: